DEMOCRACIES MUST IDENTIFY CUBA AND VENEZUELA AS THE AGGRESSORS

DEMOCRACIES MUST IDENTIFY CUBA AND VENEZUELA AS THE AGGRESSORS

With dictator Evo Morales’ fall in Bolivia, Castrochavism has been shrunken to hold power in Cuba, Venezuela and Nicaragua, plus benefit from Mexico’s subordination and that of the Fernandez/Kirchner from Argentina. In this 21st Century, there are TWO AMERICAS; the democratic one and the dictatorial other.  The axis of confrontation is between DEMOCRACY and DICTATORSHIP. The dictatorial America, led by Cuba and comprised by Venezuela and Nicaragua is in crisis, bankrupt, evident to be narco-states, with a permanent and growing risk of losing power due to the heroic internal resistance of the citizenry. In order to survive, Castrochavism -that is the dictatorial America- carries out a strategy that includes at least: 1. To increase internal repression. 2. To increase their accusations and attacks. 3. Forge alliances with those who it considers imperialism’s, or the right’s, common enemies. 4.-To unleash a violent regional offensive to destabilize and topple democratic governments. It is clear that the attacker-in-chief is Cuba with Venezuela’s usurper as its main operator, manipulating narcotics’ trafficking, the FARC, and criminal groups.  It is time to identify Cuba and Venezuela as the attackers.  

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DEMOCRACIES MUST IDENTIFY CUBA AND VENEZUELA AS THE AGGRESSORS

*Carlos Sánchez Berzaín

With dictator Evo Morales’ fall in Bolivia, Castrochavism has been shrunken to hold power in Cuba, Venezuela and Nicaragua, plus benefit from Mexico’s subordination and that of the Fernandez/Kirchner from Argentina.  Using conspiracy and violence and a vast network of international propaganda, they carry out their offensive against democracy throughout the region.  The nations, victims of this aggression, deal with it as an internal political matter, that in-turn gives Cuba and Venezuela more advantage when they instead must be identified by democracies as the aggressors.

In this 21st Century, there are TWO AMERICAS; the democratic one and the dictatorial other.  The axis of confrontation is between DEMOCRACY and DICTATORSHIP.  The dictatorial America, led by Cuba and comprised by Venezuela and Nicaragua is in crisis, bankrupt, evident to be narco-states, with a permanent and growing risk of losing power due to the heroic internal resistance of the citizenry, as it just happened in Bolivia.   The dictatorships’ crimes are internationally pointed out and bear pressure from a set of measures imposed mainly by the United States and to a lesser degree by the European Union.

In order to survive, Castrochavism -that is the dictatorial America- carries out a strategy that includes at least:  1. To increase internal repression in Cuba, Venezuela and Nicaragua revealing their condition of de-facto regimes that are solely sustained by force.  2. To increase their accusations and attacks against their indispensable -as well as fake- external enemies that it identifies as “imperialism” and “the right”.  3. Forge alliances with those who it considers imperialism’s, or the right’s, common enemies.  4. To unleash a violent regional offensive to destabilize and topple democratic governments, replicating the methodology applied from the sixties to the disappearance of the Soviet Union.

It is, within this factual reality that democratic governments’ position stand out.  Democratic governments who, following a long period of inertia and inaction highlighted by the absence of effective initiatives regarding the usurpation of power in Venezuela and Cuba’s interventionism, are now being attacked by Castrochavism and have entered into the phase of becoming victims of its attacks.  This phase of attacks labeled by Organized Crime’s spokesmen as the “Bolivarian breeze” confess to premeditated crime that democratic governments still stubbornly refuse to call it that.      What has led to this and has allowed the destabilizing attacks that we endure today is the lack of concrete decisions regarding Cuba and Venezuela’s dictatorships by members of the Organization of American States, the Group of Lima, and recently the Interamerican Treaty for Reciprocal Assistance.

Democratic governments have ignored Cuba’s capabilities and criminal record.  Regarding Venezuela, beyond recognizing Guaido as the President-In-Charge, they have done little to help Guaido to effectively serve in that position, a position that has been managed by an assembly system woven by the political parties with the sadly famous “statute for the transition” approved in order for Guaido not to become a formidable leader in democratic elections.  There have been no diplomatic, commercial, or security measures taken regarding Venezuela’s usurper regime and, least of all, regarding its puppeteer, Cuba’s regime.  This is tantamount to ignoring preventive measures to avoid the attack that is now perpetrated against its own social and political stability.

The gap created by the inaction to regain democracy in Venezuela, Cuba, Nicaragua, and Bolivia (who -alone- is liberating itself), has been filled by Castrochavism’s attacks in an inverse action that we see being executed against Ecuador, Chile, Colombia and the new Bolivia transitioning towards democracy, and more. Attacked Governments have reacted expelling Cuban and Venezuelan operators and in Bolivia and Ecuador’s case breaking relations with Venezuela and cutting some programs that enabled Cuban infiltration, but they are still allowing the threat and conspiracy to exist under the diplomatic cloak.

Latin America’s democratic governments seem to be tamed by the “solidarity with Cuba” propaganda, seem to be controlled by the fictitious “Cuban revolution”, or seem to be paralyzed by “the diplomacy of threats”.  It is clear that the attacker-in-chief is Cuba with Venezuela’s usurper as its main operator, manipulating narcotics’ trafficking, the FARC, and criminal groups.  It is time to identify Cuba and Venezuela as the attackers.  

*Attorney & Political Scientist.  Director of the Interamerican Institute for Democracy.

Published by  Infobae.com Sunday, November 24, 2019

“The opinions published herein are the sole responsibility of its author”

www.carlossanchezberzain.com

Translated from Spanish by; Edgar L. Terrazas, member of the American Translators’ Association, ATA # 234680.

 

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